The meaning of the Civil War had come to be inherent in its cost.  The nation's value and importance were both derived from and proved by the human price paid for its survival.  This equation cast the nation in debt in ways that would be transformative, for executing its obligations to the dead and their mourners required a vast expansion of the federal budget and bureaucracy and a reconceptualization of the government's role.  National cemeteries, pensions, and records that preserved names and identities involved a dramatically new understanding of the relationship of the citizen and the state. 

Without agendas, without politics, the Dead became what their survivors chose to make them.  In 1898 President William McKinley announced to the South, in a speech in Atlanta, that "the time has now come in the evolution of sentiment and feeling under the providence of God, when in the spirit of fraternity we should share with you in the care of the graves of the Confederate soldiers."  The sons and grandsons of "these heroic dead" had in the preceding year risked their lives in a new American war; the brave Confederates should be officially honored alongside their Union counterparts."  This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War.  Drew Gilpin Faust 228  

The Holland family have a rich heritage among those who fought on the side of the South during the War Between the States, otherwise known as the War of Northern Aggression. Many of their lives and accomplishments have been forgotten. It is our hope to keep their stories alive through the work of this website. We welcome your comments and contributions to this ongoing effort. Enjoy reading about the confederate history of the Holland Family in the Public Records - Military section.

Many Hollands fought in the “War Between the States” in 1862-1866.  The National Park Service lists 198 Hollands from North Carolina  as fighting on the Confederate side for the South and two Hollands from North Carolina on the Union side.  To find out if you ancestor was one of them, you can search for him here: http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/soldiers.cfm
 

BENNETT G. BARNES served in the Army of the Confederate States,  27th North Carolina Regiment, K Company.  He was 1st Lt. and commanding officer of Simon Holland, Rufus Holland, and David Woodard Peacock.  His daughter Catherine Jane Barnes was married to Amanda Holland's son, James Henry Waddell, whose father Larry Waddell also served in the American Civil War.223 

RANDALL FINNEY enlisted in the Army of the Confederate States in Thomas County, Georgia, in 1861.  He was killed in Jackson, Mississippi, in July 1863 while fighting with the Army of Tennessee.  His daughter Mary Irene Finney was William Gaston Holland (b. 1847 Georgia)'s second wife. 119

BRYAN HOLLAND enlisted 23 Aug 1862, as a Private at Wayne County, North Carolina, into "F" Company, NC 1st Light Artillery. On 20 Mar 1864 he transferred into "G" Company, NC 3rd Infantry. This may be Bryant Holland, the possible but unsubstantiated son of Curtis Holland and Nancy Holland.
Source: North Carolina Troops 1861-65, A Roster. 

 

BURDIN HOLLAND served in the Army of the Confederate States of America in Company I of the 35th North Carolina Regiment.  He enlisted in Goldsboro, North Carolina on October 11, 1861, as a Private.  He mustered into Capt. Angus J. Finlayson's Co., (Wayne County Volunteers), 35th Regiment, NC Infantry (State Troops) on 29 October 1861.  This company subsequently became Company I, 35th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry (State Troops).  He served under Captain Ellis and Lieut. William Langston.  He was discharged in Richmond on 11 August 1862 due to medical disability (aberration of mind).  His discharge states that he was 29 years old at the time, that he was 5'8" tall, had light complexion, blue eyes, dark hair, and was a farmer by occupation when enlisted.  His records also indicate that he was born in Wayne County, North Carolina.  He was wounded in Williamsburg, VA.  He was suffering from shell shock from bomb shell at the battle of Williamsburg and was deaf in one ear drum.

His record is reported in North Carolina Troops 1861-65, A Roster,  published in 1993; which erroneously misspelled as "Burden" and gave his age at enlistment as 22.  He was 28 when he enlisted.

The information on Burdin Holland is from his great-grandson's wife, Vickie Holland.33
Also from North Carolina Troops 1861-1865: A Roster 

View the records of Burdin Holland from the General Services Administration, National Archives and Records Service, Washington, D. C. The image links below open in a new copy of your Internet browser. You will automatically return to this page when you close the newly opened browser window.

Cover sheet of Burdin Holland Confederate military records 
Company Muster-in and Descriptive Roll 
Company Muster Roll, 35th NC Regiment, Co. I, Jan & Feb 1862
Company Muster Roll, 35th NC Regiment, Co. I, Mar & Apr 1862
Receipt Roll, 35th NC Regiment, Co. I, June 16, 1862
Register of Chimborazo Hospital, No. 2, Richmond, VA, July 2, 1862
Register of General Hospital, Farmville, VA, August 1862
Disability List at C. S. A. General Hospital, Farmville, VA, August 11, 1862
Report of Sick and Wounded in General Hospital, Farmville, VA, August 1862
Regimental Return, 35th NC Regiment, Co. I, October 1862
Payment Order, 5 March 1863
Register of Payments to Discharged Soldiers, 35th NC Regiment, Co. I, April 13, 1863
Roll of Honor
Disability Discharge, August 11, 1862
Soldier's Application for Pension - cover sheet, June 22, 1901
Soldier's Application for Pension - page 1
Soldier's Application for Pension - page 2
Soldier's Application for Pension - page 3
Widow's Application for Confederate Pension - cover 
Widow's Application for Confederate Pension, October 20, 1931 
Widow's Application for Confederate Pension, Certificate of Witnesses 

CURTIS (CHARLES) HOLLAND enlisted in the Confederate States of Army as a Private on 2 February 1963, at Wayne County, North Carolina.  His place of residence was not listed. On the same day, he mustered into "D" Company, NC 8th Battalion. He died of pneumonia on 12 March 1963.  This appears to be the son of Elisha Holland and Elizabeth Holland.  Notice that he enlisted on the same day and place and served in the same company as his brother Thomas Holland.

Provided by George Randy Peacock.  Historical Data Systems, Inc., from North Carolina Troops 1861-1865: A Roster 69

DEBREAUX HOLLAND enlisted in Hurt's Battalion of the Alabama Light Artillery in June 1862, as a private in Hurt's Battalion of the Alabama Light Artillery in the Confederate States of America Army.  Two years later, on May 30, 1864, he was sent to the hospital from his unit with an illness.  For about nine months he remained on the sick list from his unit, and after the end of February 1865, there is no further information about him.  It is plausible that Debreaux died of his illness not long after the end of the war.  If so, he would have died in his early thirties. 149, 251

ENOS J. HOLLAND enlisted in the Confederate Army as a Private, serving North Carolina; the date of his enlistment is unknown. He was listed as AWOL, then listed as Deserted on 10 April 1864. On 11 July 1864 he transferred into "A" Co., NC 16th Battalion Cavalry. He also had service in "E" Co., GA 62nd Cavalry while listed as AWOL. He was  received at Fort Monroe, VA on 8 October 1864 and took the Oath of Allegiance on 22 October 1864 at Fort Monroe, VA. He survived the War.

From North Carolina Troops 1861-1865: A Roster 69 

EXUM HAYWOOD HOLLAND, Private
Born in Wayne County, NC where he resided as a farmer prior to enlisting in the Confederate States of America Army during the War Between the States in Wake County, NC,  at age 32, July 15, 1862. On that date he was mustered into "I" Co, NC 15th Infantry.  He was present or accounted for until wounded in the left thigh and captured at Crampton's Pass, Maryland, September 14, 1862 and held as Prisoner. Hospitalized at Burkettsville, Maryland, until transferred to Fort McHenry, Maryland, at an unspecified date. Paroled and transferred to City Point, Virginia, November 12, 1862, for Prisoner of War exchange. Reported absent wounded until he was retired from service on December 22, 1864, by reason of disability from wounds.

From North Carolina Troops 1861-1865: A Roster 69

View the records of Exum Haywood Holland from the General Services Administration, National Archives and Records Service, Washington, D. C.:

A HENRY A. HOLLAND enlisted in the Confederate Army 20 Mar 1864 in Wake County, NC, as a Private.  He was in "A" Co., NC 6th Infantry. He was Surrendered on 9 Apr 1865 at Appomattox Court House, VA. His residence was not listed in his military records. This may or may not be the Henry Holland, possible son of Absalom Holland and Nancy Hales. Several of the Hollands in this family enlisted in Wake County. 

JOSEPH HOLLAND enlisted in the Confederate Army on 10 June 1861 at Wayne County, NC as a Private and mustered into "K" Co. NC 27th Infantry.  He was listed as:
* Wounded 15 September 1862 South Mountain, MD
* POW 15 September 1862 South Mountain, MD
* Confined 19 September 1862 Fort Delaware, DE
* Paroled 2 October 1862 Fort Delaware, DE
* Transferred 2 October 1862 Aiken's Landing, VA
* Exchanged 10 November 1862 Aiken's Landing, VA (Returned)
* Wounded 5 May 1864 Wilderness, VA
* Returned 1 November 1864 (place not stated)
* POW 29 March 1865 Goldsboro, NC
* Confined 2 April 1865 Hart's Island, NY Harbor
* Oath of Allegiance 18 June 1865 Hart's Island, NY Harbor

Date and method of discharge not given.

Source:  North Carolina Troops 1861-1865: A Roster 69

RUFUS HENRY HOLLAND served in the Confederate Army during the War Between the States in Company K, 27th Regiment of the North Carolina Infantry.  He enlisted in Wayne County, North Carolina, 10 June 1861, at the age of 27 as a Corporal.  He was reduced to the rank of Private on 22 April 1862.  He was present or accounted for through April 1, 1865.  He was detailed as a shoemaker for much of the war, probably because of his disability due to wounds.  North Carolina pension records indicate he was wounded at Knoxville, Tennessee in 1863 and was wounded at Petersburg in 1864.  He was captured as a Union Prisoner of War 2 April 1865 at Petersburg, VA and was imprisoned at City Point, Virginia, and Point Lookout, Maryland, taking the oath of allegiance to the United States 27 June 1865 at Point Lookout, Maryland.

This information is from D. Franklin Hinnant, Jr. of Fremont, North Carolina and from North Carolina Troops 1861-1865: A Roster. 

SIMON HOLLAND served in the Confederate Army during the War Between the States in Company K, 27th Regiment of the North Carolina Infantry.  His residence was not listed in his military records.  He enlisted at age 23 on 10 June 1861, in Wayne County, NC, as a Private, and was mustered into "K" Co., NC 27th Infantry.  He was listed as deserted to enemy on 18 March 1865 (place not stated).  He took the Oath of Allegiance on 24 March 1865 in Washington, DC.  The date and method of his discharge are not given.

This information was was furnished by Mrs. Ethel Lamm of Elizabeth City, North Carolina,  to M. K. D. Holland, giving the following information on her grandfather Simon Holland:  "Simon Holland joined the Confederate Army when North Carolina seceded and served until two weeks before General Lee surrendered.

Also from North Carolina Troops 1861-1865: A Roster. 69

Dwight Mitchell,59  great-great grandson of Simon Holland gives the following information from the headstones on Simon and Willie's graves:

Simon Holland, 
Pvt Co. K NC Trps. 
Confederate States Army  
Feb 15 1838, March 1903

 

THOMAS HOLLAND enlisted in the Confederate Army as a Private on 2 February 1863, at Wayne County, North Carolina.  His place of residence was listed as Wayne County. On the same day, he mustered into "D" Company, NC 8th Battalion. On 2 October 1863 he transferred into "L" Company, NC 66th Infantry.  This appears to be the son of Elisha Holland and Elizabeth Holland.  Notice that he enlisted on the same day and place, and served in the same company, as his brother Charles (or Curtis) Holland. The date and method of his discharge are not given in the source referenced.

Provided by George Randy Peacock.  Historical Data Systems, Inc., from North Carolina Troops 1861-1865: A Roster 69

 

URIAH HOLLAND, Private. Uriah Holland enlisted in the Confederate Army during the War Between the States as a Private in Wayne County 18 July 1863; he would have been 32 year old at that time.  His residence is not listed.  He was in "D" Co. NC 8th Cavalry Battalion.  On 2 October 1863 he transferred into "L" Co. NC 66th Infantry. The date and method of his discharge are not given; he did survive the war.    

From North Carolina Troops 1861-1865: A Roster. 69

 

WILLIAM GASTON HOLLAND
William Gaston Holland enlisted in the War Between the States as a Private on 16 July 1862 in Wake County, North Carolina at the age of 30 under the name William M. G. Holland.  He mustered into "D" Co., NC 5th Infantry. He was in Early's and Garland's Brigade, Early's and D. H. Hill's Division of the Army of Northern Virginia.  He was promoted.  He died of disease eight months after enlisting, on 12 March 1863, at Guinea Station, Virginia.  It is uncertain to me whether he is Gaston Holland, first son of Exum Holland and Penny Boswell, who was born in 1832.  Information is needed on this William Gaston Holland.   

From North Carolina Troops 1861-1865: A Roster  (NCRoster C), 1993.69

WILLIAM HENRY HOLLAND enlisted in the the Confederate States of America Army on 1 February 1863, to serve in Hunt's Battalion, Alabama Light Artillery as a private.  He was assigned to Petersburg, Virginia, 1 November 1964, and that is the last report we have of W. H. Holland.

WOODARD D. HOLLAND, Sergeant 
He enlisted in the Confederate Army during the War Between the States on 22 September 1862 at Wayne County, NC as a Private. His residence is not listed.  On that day he mustered into "D" Co. NC 1st Inf LDT.  He was transferred out on 1/18/1864 and into "D" Co. NC 67th Infantry.  He was promoted to Sergeant 12/15/1863 (estimated day of promotion). The date and method of his discharge are not given; he survived the war.

From North Carolina Troops 1861-1865: A Roster69

WOODARD H. HOLLAND enlisted in the Confederate Army on 12 September 1862, in Randolph County, Alabama.  His war registration record described him as being 5'10" tall, with red hair and a fair complexion.  He served for three years, as a private in the 60th Alabama Regiment which was organized by consolidating the 3rd Regiment and 4 companies of the 1st Infantry (Woodard was in Company D) Battalions, Hilliard's Legion November 25, 1863 .  He participated in several major battles that incurred large casualties.  These battles included Chickamauga, Knoxville, Beans Station, Drewry's Bluff, Richmond.  At the end of 1864, the 60th was assigned to the Army of Northern Virginia and the "Trenches" near Petersburg, Virginia, in an effort to save the railroad lines between North Carolina and Virginia.151  The Trench was a wide ditch running parallel with the line of the enemy, and then other ditches ran back from this in various directions.  The 60th entered the "Trenches" on July 9, 1864, and came out March 14, 1865. Battles were ceaseless during that period and losses were heavy.  This was the same area of battle Amanda Holland's husband Larry Waddell fought in.  Amanda Holland and Woodard Haywood Holland are first cousins.  Woodard H. Holland survived the war.

DAVID WOODARD PEACOCK enlisted in the 27th Reg. Co. "K" NC Infantry on 10 June 1861 at Camp Lewis in Wayne County, North Carolina.  He was transferred into the 15th Reg. Co. "I" NC Infantry on 16 February 1863.  He was wounded at Bristol Station, Virginia on 14 October 1863 and sent to Camp Winder Hospital, Virginia, to recover.  The Bristoe Campaign was waged in October and November 1863 in Prince William County under the command of Maj. Gen. G. K. Warren (U.S.) and Lt. Gen. A. P. Hill (C.S.A.).  On October 14, 1863, A. P. Hill's corps stumbled upon two corps of retreating Union army at Bristoe Station and attacked witout proper reconnaissance..  Two brigades of Henry Heth's division were mauled.  Casualties were estimated at 1,980.  A. P. Hill lost standing in Lee's eyes, who angrily ordered him to bury his dead and say no more about it. 

David Woodard Peacock returned to service and surrendered 9 April 1865 at Appomattox Court Chouse, Virginia, with General Robert E. Lee. He was listed on the "Roll of Honor" for the 15th Reg. and was listed as paroled at Appomattox on April 9, 1865. These two honors are very rare indeed, especially to have fought in the war for the entire campaign.  Only 122 of the 15th Regiment, Cooke's Brigade, were present at the surrender and he was one (documented on Appomattox Parole list).

"He would have enlisted with Simon and Rufus HOLLAND, his future brothers-in-law. He married Zilpha Holland on Dec. 25, 1866 and they had 9 children.  They moved to Appling Co., Ga. before 1900 all together on a train. My G Grandfather, Ebenezer Peacock married a Deen from there...my grandfather David Adel married a Hutcheson from there...and my dad George C. married a Smith/Davis from Coffee Co., Ga. So, my roots are deeply embedded in the Appling Co., Ga. area as well as Johnston / Wayne Co.'s of NC."

Provided by George Randy Peacock   NCCivilWar@gmail.com

 

EDWARD SION SMITH (Sion Smith was the son of Unicey Holland and the grandson of Woodard D. Holland.  He was also husband to Louisa Jane Holland, Exum Holland's daughter.) Family lore says he ran away from home to join the War Between the States when he was 16.  The Army sent him back because he was under-aged.  He enlisted again when he turned 18 in 1864.  He was captured by the Union army in July 1864 and sent to a prison in Maryland where he remained until the end of the war.  Upon his release, he walked home, stealing a mule and a gun along the way.  The gun remains in his family.

These military records have been found but it is not known which, if either, are Edward Sion Smith:

E S. Smith (Best Poss. But from Wake Co.)

Residence was not listed;
Enlisted on 5/12/1864 at Wake County, NC as a Private.
On 5/12/1864 he mustered into "D" Co. NC 5th Infantry;
Date and method of discharge not given:
He was listed as: * POW 7/4/1864 Harper's Ferry, WV
Confined 7/5/1864 Old Capitol Prison, Washington, DC (Estimated day);
Transferred 7/23/1864 Elmira, NY:
Transferred 10/11/1864 Point Lookout, MD:
Exchanged 11/15/1864 Venus Point, GA.  No further record.

 

Edward Smith (NOT CAPTURED)

Residence was not listed;
Enlisted on 10/9/1864 at Johnston County, NC as a Private.
On 10/9/1864 he mustered into "B" Co. NC 10th Battn Heavy Artillery;
Date and method of discharge not given;
He was listed as: On rolls 10/30/1864 (place not stated) 

LARRY WADDELL was Amanda Holland's second husband.  Amanda Holland, daughter of Jinnett Holland and granddaughter of Elisha Holland and Patience Peacock, married Larry Waddell on March 4, 1859.  Larry Waddell and his brother Alfred Waddell joined the 15th Infantry Regiment of the Confederate States of America in Wake County, North Carolina, in July 1862.  They served in Company I.  Larry Waddell was wounded in the Battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia, in December 1862.  After recovering from his wounds he continued his service in the Confederacy. 

He participated in and died at the Battle of Globe Tavern south of Petersburg, Dinwiddie County, Virginia, trying to save the railroad lines between North Carolina and Virginia.  By this time, David W. Peacock had transferred into the 15th NC Regiment, Company I and was there at the time of Larry Waddell's death.  They probably knew each other, having married first cousins, Zilpha Jean Holland and Amanda Holland.  223  

The Battle of Globe Tavern was fought August 18-21, 1864, under commanders Maj. Gen. G. K. Warren (U.S.), Gen. Robert E. Lee, Lt. Gen. A. P. Hill, Maj. Gen. William Mahone (C.S.A.).  Casualties were estimated to be 5, 879 of which 4,279 were U.S. and 1,600 C.S.A.  With the fighting at Globe Tavern, Gen. Grant succeeded in extending his siege lines to the west and cutting Petersburg's primary rail connection with Wilmington, North Carolina.  The Confederates were then forced to off-load rail cars at Stony Creek Station and make a 30-mile wagon haul up Boydton Plank road to reach Petersburg.  Confederate general John C. C. Sanders was killed on August 21. 


 

Across the Dark River: The Odyssey of the 56th N.C. Infantry in the American Civil War by Clyde H. Ray.  This book takes the reader to the limits -- the feeling of sadness, frustration and empathy for the members of the 56th infantry during their times of turmoil -- and then the feeling of triumph at their victories, no matter how small or great. 

 

 

In Search of Confederate Ancestors: The Guide (Journal of Confederate History) by J. H. Segars, John McGlone (Editor) John B. Well, Genealogist-in-Chief, Sons of Confederate Veterans wrote, "I recommend this book without reservation as the best work of its kind ....a must for every serious Confederate researcher."  


If you can add any military information on the Holland and related families, it would be most appreciated by all descendents.  Send to Diana Holland Faust.

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Holland site published 10 July 1996  -  This page added 12 December 2001.  Last updated 03 Aug 2012

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